10/24/2016

TULSA CAMPAIGN TO PREVENT TEEN PREGNANCY
NAMES 2016 COMMUNITY CHAMPION AND CHANGEMAKER AWARD WINNERS

TULSA, Okla. – Tulsa Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy has selected honorees for its 2016 Community Champion Awards. Each year award winners are showcased at the Tulsa Campaign’s 3rd Anniversary & Awards Luncheon which is scheduled this year for November 10.

Each year an educational agency, health center or community based-organization that is doing excellent work in the field of youth development and teen pregnancy prevention is selected as a recipient of the Community Champion Award.  This year two programs—Youth Services of Tulsa and the Tulsa Carrera Program—stood out as worthy recipients, and both will be highlighted.  The winners were selected based on their work to provide youth with many touchpoints and exhibit a continuum of care through linkages between schools and health centers.

Both recipients embody all of these crucial components that our young people need.  They have health education staff that help students navigate the sometimes complicated and unknown process of accessing sexual health services. Youth Services of Tulsa is being recognized for its programs including PregNot, Health Education & Prevention (HEP) and the University of Oklahoma’s School of Medicine Youth Clinic at YST. PregNot empowers youth to avoid high-risk behaviors, prevent pregnancy and STDs and focus on achieving positive life goals.  HEP connects youth to health care, preventative care and health education. YST encourages adolescents to take responsibility for their health and their future.

The Tulsa Carrera Program is also being recognized for its Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention Program. The Carrera Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention Program is in partnership with Union Public Schools and the Community Service Council of Tulsa.  This research-based program employs a long-term, holistic approach to empower and educate our youth.  The Union Carrera initiative is a replication of a successful national model, established by Dr. Michael A. Carrera in 1984, that selects students entering the sixth grade and serves them through high school graduation and college admission.

Tulsa Campaign CEO Sharla Owens applauds the honorees stating, “We are delighted that Tulsa not only has one agency worthy of this award, but two. Both Youth Services of Tulsa and the Tulsa Carrera Program are champions of health education for teens and have been an integral component in connecting local schools to health centers in order to make sure our youth are receiving the best education and care possible.”

COMMUNITY CHANGEMAKER AWARD

Tulsa Campaign leadership will also present its inaugural Community Changemaker Award to Sharon Gallagher, Director of Collaborative Initiatives at the Tulsa Area United Way. As a long-time community advocate, Sharon brought Tulsa Area United Way to the table early-on in the formation of Tulsa Campaign. She is more than a “funder.”  She is a champion of the work, an original incorporator, served on the early advisory board and brought insight, leadership and inspiration.

THE ANNIVERSARY AND AWARD LUNCHEON

As a culmination to October as “Let’s Talk” Month, Tulsa Campaign will host a luncheon to celebrate its 3rd anniversary and honor Community Champion and Changemaker award recipients. Forrest Alton, a national leader in teen pregnancy prevention, will be the keynote speaker. Under Mr. Alton’s leadership, the South Carolina Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy saw substantial growth in scope and reach resulting in the state of South Carolina experiencing a significant reduction in its teen birth rate. In 2012, Mr. Alton guided an initial community needs analysis that led to the formation of Tulsa Campaign. The luncheon will be held on November 10 at SkyLoft (15 East 5th St) from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. More information on Mr. Alton and the 3rd Anniversary & Awards Luncheon can be found at tulsacampaign.org/events.

TEEN BIRTHS IN TULSA

Tulsa County’s teen birth rate for girls ages 15-19 continued to decline in 2014, dropping to 38.5 births per 1,000 teen girls, which reflected a 19% decline over the past two years and a 47% decline since the peak year of 1991. The state teen birth rate, while declining from the previous year, dropped back to 49th among all 50 states in 2014 — meaning Oklahoma had the second highest (worst) teen birth rate in the U.S. There were 4,802 teen births in Oklahoma in 2014. Only Arkansas had a higher teen birth rate at 39.5. It is estimated the Oklahoma’s teen births cost taxpayers $169 million each year. (All data from the National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy).

While there is still much progress to be made, Tulsa Campaign credits much of the progress to the strong partnerships among local groups like Tulsa Public Schools, Tulsa City-County Health Department, Youth Services of Tulsa and others. During the last school year, over 3,500 middle and high school students received medically accurate prevention education due to the Tulsa Campaign’s efforts.

ABOUT TULSA CAMPAIGN TO PREVENT TEEN PREGNANCY
The mission of Tulsa Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy is to equip the community with strategies to reduce teen pregnancy for the purpose of improving the health and economic well-being for all. Their goal is to reduce the teen birth rate in Tulsa County by 30% by 2020 through systems-level change.

The organization focuses on increasing public awareness of the issue of teen pregnancy, providing training and technical assistance to schools and community organizations to implement evidence-based, medically-accurate sex education and building the capacity of local health centers and providers to ensure teens have access to healthcare services. For more information about Tulsa Campaign and how you can make a difference in our community, please visit TulsaCampaign.org.

 


TULSA CAMPAIGN TO PREVENT TEEN PREGNANCY KICKS OFF “LET’S TALK MONTH” BY ASKING TEENS AND PARENTS TO DREAM BIG AT THE TULSA STATE FAIR

TULSA, Okla.- This fall the Tulsa Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy will be talking to parents and teens across the area as part of National “Let’s Talk” Month. “Let’s Talk” Month encourages parent and child communication about sex and healthy relationships.

KEY EVENTS

10/7-10/8 – Tulsa State Fair – 10 a.m.–10 p.m.

4145 E 21st St, Tulsa, OK 74114 River Spirit Expo (Southside, Lower Level)

The Tulsa Campaign will have a space in the main exhibit hall (Southside Lower Level) at the Tulsa State Fair where teens, parents and the community at large can participate in an interactive display to “dream out loud.” Dreams from the community for our teenagers will  be captured on a colorful wall (photo below). The Tulsa Campaign hopes to especially reach adults through this effort to encourage them to have “the talk” with the teens in their life.

Studies find that teens who have a trusted adult whom they can have open and honest conversations with about sex and healthy relationships tend to delay initiation of sexual activity and are far less likely to parent early due to increased contraceptive use (from Advocates for Youth).

Propeller  Communications     ŸŸ     www.thinkpropeller.com      ŸŸ     918.488.0110

10/15 – Youth Leadership Council Orientation and Retreat

Interviews available 3:30 p.m.-4 p.m. – Youth Services of Tulsa – 311 S Madison Ave, Tulsa

The Tulsa Campaign will host an inaugural retreat for its Youth Leadership Council, which  has 17 teen members between the ages of 14-18. Teens completed applications and creative components to be a part of the group that was established last year to increase understanding of teen pregnancy, sexual health and resources for Tulsa County’s youth. This will be an opportunity for members to develop advocacy and leadership skills.

11/10 – Anniversary and Award Luncheon – 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. SkyLoft – 15 East 5th  St

As a culmination to “Let’s Talk” Month, The Tulsa Campaign will host a luncheon to celebrate its third anniversary and honor key partners who have excelled the effort to reduce the teen birth rate over  the past year. Forrest Alton, a national leader in teen pregnancy prevention, will be the keynote speaker. Under Mr. Alton’s leadership, the South Carolina Campaign saw substantial growth in scope and reach resulting in the state of South Carolina experiencing a significant reduction in its teen birth rate. In 2012, Mr. Alton guided an initial community needs analysis that led to the formation of the Tulsa Campaign. Award winners will be announced later this month.

STORY IDEAS

  • Community invited to share their dreams for teens at the Tulsa State Fair
  • Local teens form group to focus on reducing the number of teen parents
  • Award winners announced during “Let’s Talk Month” to be honored in November
  • National expert on reducing teen births, Forrest Alton, comes to Tulsa

TEEN BIRTHS IN TULSA

Tulsa County’s teen birth rate for girls ages 15-19 continued to decline in 2014, dropping to

38.5 births per 1,000 teen girls, which reflected a 19% decline over the past two years and a 47% decline since the peak year of 1991. The state teen birth rate, while declining from the previous year, dropped back to 49th among all 50 states in 2014 — meaning Oklahoma had the second highest (worst) teen birth rate in the U.S. There were 4,802 teen births in Oklahoma in 2014. Only Arkansas had a higher teen birth rate at 39.5. It is estimated the Oklahoma’s teen births cost taxpayers $169 million each year. (All data from the National  Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy).

While there is still much progress to be made, the Tulsa Campaign credits much of the progress to the strong partnerships among local groups like Tulsa Public Schools, Tulsa City- County Health Department, Youth Services of Tulsa and others. During the last school year,

over 3,500 middle and high school students received medically accurate prevention education due to the Tulsa Campaign’s efforts.

“LET’S TALK” MONTH

In a newly released national survey, teens age 12-15 state that parents are more than three times as likely as their friends to be their key influencer when making decisions about sex (access survey). The Tulsa Campaign knows that parents are key, and they created an annual roadshow in 2014 as a way of taking its message into the community to listen to families about what support they need to start the conversation. The Tulsa State Fair will be the primary stop in the roadshow this year, with smaller presentations to be made throughout the month.

RESOURCES

Parents, teens and educators can find a wealth of resources and at  tulsacampaign.org/havethetalk.

ABOUT THE TULSA CAMPAIGN TO PREVENT TEEN PREGNANCY

The mission of the Tulsa Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy is to equip the community with strategies to reduce teen pregnancy for the purpose of improving the health and economic well-being for all. Their goal is to reduce the teen birth rate in Tulsa County by 30% by 2020 through systems-level changes.

The organization focuses on increasing public awareness of the issue of teen pregnancy, providing training and technical assistance to schools and community organizations to implement evidence-based, medically-accurate sex education and building the capacity of local health centers and providers to ensure teens have access to healthcare services. For more information about the Tulsa Campaign and how you can make a difference in our community, please visit TulsaCampaign.org.

SOCIAL MEDIA

Facebook:    facebook.com/preventteenpregnancyok

Twitter: twitter.com/tulsacampaign


June 29, 2016

TULSA CAMPAIGN TO PREVENT TEEN PREGNANCY SELECTS
NEW CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

The Board of Directors of the Tulsa Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy recently selected Sharla Owens as the new Chief Executive Officer. Owens started her duties on June 1.

Ms. Owens brings more than 20 years of executive non-profit management experience. Most recently, she served as the Chief Executive Officer for Big Brothers Big Sisters of Oklahoma, where she had been since 2006. She also brings a wealth of fund development expertise and years of experience generating and increasing earned revenue for non-profits including Big Brothers Big Sisters of Oklahoma and Philbrook Museum of Art, where she served as Development Manager.

“If our community is going to successfully lower our unacceptable teen birth rate, we need the very best leaders at the helm of the effort,” said Board President Joseph Cunningham. M.D., divisional senior vice president of health care delivery and chief medical officer “The Board of the Tulsa Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy is confident that Sharla Owens is just the right person to do that.”

Ms. Owens comes to the organization with a passion for its mission of equipping the community with strategies to reduce teen pregnancy for the purpose of improving the health and economic well-being for all. “I have spent the last decade advocating for young people, and I am thrilled to continue this work by joining the Tulsa Campaign. Our state has many challenges, and the teen birth rate is connected to many of them. As individuals, schools, businesses and faith groups continue to collaborate around this issue, we will see fewer children born into poverty, more teens graduating high school and going to college, and a more skilled workforce overall. I am honored and excited to get started on this important work.”

The board conducted an extensive search and interview process and considered multiple candidates. During this time, Mindy Roe Galoob led the organization as the interim executive director. “We want to extend our sincere gratitude to Mindy who led the team since October 2015,” Dr. Cunningham said. “Mindy has done an excellent job of guiding the organization through an important time of transition.”

Tulsa Campaign will be hosting a meet-n-greet Open House at their offices (1601 S. Main Street, Suite 200) on August 9, 2016 from 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. to introduce Ms. Owens to the Tulsa stakeholders working collectively to reduce the teen birth rate in our community.

About the Tulsa Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy
The mission of the Tulsa Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy is to equip the community with strategies to reduce teen pregnancy for the purpose of improving the health and economic well-being for all. Their goal is to reduce the teen birth rate in Tulsa County by 30% by 2020 through systems-level changes.
The organization focuses on increasing public awareness of the issue of teen pregnancy, providing training and technical assistance to schools and community organizations to implement evidence-based, medically-accurate sex education and building the capacity of local health centers and providers to ensure teens have access to healthcare services. For more information about the Tulsa Campaign and how you can make a difference in our community, please visit TulsaCampaign.org.


 

 

 

TULSA CAMPAIGN TO PREVENT TEEN PREGNANCY URGING TEENS
TO “TAKE THE QUIZ” FOR NATIONAL TEEN PREGNANCY PREVENTION MONTH

WHAT: The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy hosts a National Day each year to equip teens with the knowledge and resources to avoid pregnancy. On National Day (May 4) and throughout the month of May, teens will be invited to visit www.StayTeen.org to participate in a National Day Quiz, which challenges people to think carefully about what they might do “in the moment” through a series of interactive scenarios.

Last year’s National Day saw record participation with more than 600,000 teens and young adults taking the Quiz, downloading resources and sharing information through social media. Although since the early 1990s, the teen birth rate in the U.S. has declined by 61% and is now at a record low, Oklahoma still has the second highest rate in the nation. When teen pregnancy declines, opportunities for teens increase.

EVENTS: For Adults: Tulsa Campaign along with Tulsa Teen Pregnancy Prevention Coalition and its local partners will be at Guthrie Green on May
4 from 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. distributing materials to encourage adults to talk to the teens in their lives about sex, love and healthy relationships.

For Youth: The Tulsa Campaign Youth Leadership Council will be at Promenade Mall on May 7 from 2-4 p.m. to promote the Quiz. Computers will be onsite.

THE QUIZ: Visit www.StayTeen.org beginning on May 4.

About the Tulsa Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy
The mission of the Tulsa Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy is to equip the community with strategies to reduce teen pregnancy for the purpose of improving the health and economic well-being for all. Their goal is to reduce the teen birth rate in Tulsa County by 30% by 2020 through systems-level changes.
The organization focuses on increasing public awareness of the issue of teen pregnancy, providing training and technical assistance to schools and community organizations to implement evidence-based, medically-accurate sex education and building the capacity of local health centers and providers to ensure teens have access to healthcare services. For more information about the Tulsa Campaign and how you can make a difference in our community, please visit TulsaCampaign.org.


 

 

TULSA CAMPAIGN TO PREVENT TEEN PREGNANCY WINS FIRST PLACE

FOR PRESENTATION AT NATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ADOLESCENT HEALTH

 

The University of Michigan Health System’s Adolescent Health Initiative hosted its third annual Conference on Adolescent Health April 18-19 in Ypsilanti, Michigan. This conference—with the theme of “Translating Research into Practice”—targeted physicians, nurses, social workers, registered dietitians, health educators, public health professionals and all others who work with adolescents in a health care capacity around the country. The conference focused on adolescent health topics including outcomes research, evidence-based healthcare practices, best practices and the communication skills needed to work with youth.

 

In addition to skills-building workshops and plenary speakers, the conference included a poster competition where researchers, health professionals and students were asked to present an innovative approach or solution to a problem affecting adolescent health. The Tulsa Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy won first place for their poster and presentation about the barriers youth face in accessing teen-friendly health services. Forty-eight groups from around the country participated in the competition.

 

Organizations across the country submitted abstracts summarizing their research, and a conference abstract review committee reviewed all proposals and selected final presenters. Abstracts were evaluated based on relevance to adolescent health practice and the substance and clarity of content. Special consideration was given to those who made extra effort to engage youth in their research and program processes.

 

The selected presenters turned their findings into a large-format poster to offer attendees a visual representation of their work. The posters were on display at the conference, and Katie Sawicki and LaBrisa Williams with the Tulsa Campaign presented the research and recommendations.

The Tulsa Campaign partnered with The Mine and the Tulsa City-County Health Department in order to gather data concerning these barriers. Their findings focused on how the lack of reliable and affordable transportation impedes a teen’s access to health services that provide teens with information regarding sexual health, birth control and sexually transmitted diseases. Due to age, cost and time restrictions, transportation is a major barrier that many youth face when accessing health services in Tulsa.

 

Their research found that 22 percent of teens cited “getting a ride” as the most difficult part of getting to a clinic. Although Tulsa does have a public transit system, 84 percent of the teens surveyed do not use it, and data collection found that the average time by bus between common Tulsa landmarks (malls, schools, etc.) and teen-friendly clinics was 56 minutes. “The more our community can identify and address barriers like transportation for teens, the more progress we will continue to see in lowering our staggering teen birth numbers,” stated Mindy Galoob, interim executive director of the Tulsa Campaign.

 

Based on their findings, the Tulsa Campaign recommends two items related to transportation in order to improve teen access to health centers. First, more teens could learn how to use the bus systems by enlisting influential teens to make public transit more appealing by sharing their experiences through social media. Free bus passes also could be given as incentives to encourage use. Second, a volunteer driver program could be established where vetted adults could drive youth to appointments. These two recommendations will become a pilot program through The Mine, which serves as a hub for local entrepreneurs, creatives, non-profits and developers to create a better world through innovation and collaboration. “Our Mine Fellows are on the forefront of local innovation. It’s exciting to see those insights and hard work being showcased on a national level,” shared Rebecca Butcher, program manager at The Mine.

 

This research is especially important in Oklahoma, which is ranked second in the nation for the number of teen births. Through concentrated local efforts, Tulsa County’s teen birth rate for girls ages 15-19 continued to decline in 2014, dropping to 36.1 per 1,000 teens, which reflected a 23% decline over the past two years.

 

About the Tulsa Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy
The mission of the Tulsa Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy is to equip the community with strategies to reduce teen pregnancy for the purpose of improving the health and economic well-being for all. Their goal is to reduce the teen birth rate in Tulsa County by 30% by 2020 through systems-level changes.

The organization focuses on increasing public awareness of the issue of teen pregnancy, providing training and technical assistance to schools and community organizations to implement evidence-based, medically-accurate sex education and building the capacity of local health centers and providers to ensure teens have access to healthcare services. For more information about the Tulsa Campaign and how you can make a difference in our community, please visit TulsaCampaign.org.

 


 

 

TULSA CAMPAIGN WORKING TO IMPROVE THE STATE’S
POOR TEEN BIRTH RATES
Tulsa County’s teen birth rate for girls ages 15-19 continued to decline in 2014, dropping to 36.1, which reflected a 23% decline over the past two years. The most significant decrease in the county’s teen birth rates occurred among the 15-17 school-age population, where the birth rate declined by one-third over the past two years. The state teen birth rate, while declining from the previous year, dropped back to 49th among all 50 states in 2014 — meaning Oklahoma had the second highest (worst) teen birth rate in the U.S.

 

“The expansion of local prevention efforts has shown that the Tulsa community is serious about making sure our young people have the support they need to finish their education, protect their health and avoid pregnancy in their teens,” stated Mindy Roe Galoob, Interim Executive Director for the Tulsa Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy. “This year, the Tulsa Campaign will continue to coordinate community efforts to strengthen quality sex education and teen-friendly health services — working with schools, parents, health centers and youthserving organizations, “ she continued.
The Tulsa Campaign credits much of the progress to the strong partnerships among local groups like Tulsa Public Schools, Tulsa City-County Health Department, Youth Services of Tulsa and others. “During the last school year, our strong partnerships resulted in over 3,500 middle and high school students receiving medically accurate prevention education,” highlighted Heather Duvall, Director of Education & Health Initiatives for the Tulsa Campaign. “These programs provide essential information that will help young people make healthy, responsible decisions as they deal with the intense media messages and societal influences facing them today,” Duvall continued.
The 2014 state birth rate for 15-19 year-olds was 38.5, a decrease of 19% over the past two years. Even with that decline, however, Oklahoma’s ranking dropped back to 49th out of all 50 states, according to the Final 2014 Birth Data report released by the CDC National Center for Health Statistics. Only Arkansas had a higher teen birth rate at 39.5. Birth rates are the number of births per 1,000 girls of the same age range. “This is a long-haul issue and continuing to invest in local strategies and solutions that address this critical public health issue is essential,” says Galoob. “We remain energized and excited to help advance this important work in 2016 and beyond. The young people of Tulsa are worth it.”
About the Tulsa Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy The mission of the Tulsa Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy is to equip the community with strategies to reduce teen pregnancy for the purpose of improving the health and economic well-being for all. Their goal is to reduce the teen birth rate in Tulsa County by 30% by 2020 through systems-level changes.
The organization focuses on increasing public awareness of the issue of teen pregnancy, providing training and technical assistance to schools and community organizations to implement evidence-based, medically-accurate sex education and building the capacity of local health centers and providers to ensure teens have access to healthcare services. For more information about the Tulsa Campaign and how you can make a difference in our community, please visit TulsaCampaign.org.

 


 

 

THOREAU DEMONSTRATION ACADEMY RECEIVES COMMUNITY CHAMPION AWARD 

IN EDUCATION FROM THE TULSA CAMPAIGN TO PREVENT TEEN PREGNANCY

 

Tulsa, Okla. – The Tulsa Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy (Tulsa Campaign) presented the Community Champion Award in Education to Thoreau Demonstration Academy in a ceremony on December 3, 2015. The award is presented each year to two partners of the Tulsa Campaign that best exemplify a focus on reducing Tulsa’s teen birth rate through excellence in care and education.

 

Thoreau was selected as the Community Champion in Education because of their excellent effort to support the implementation of an evidence-based, age-appropriate sexual education program. Because of strong support by teachers, administrators and parents, Thoreau achieved the highest student and parent participation rates among all schools coordinated by Tulsa Campaign during the 2014-2015 school year.

 

Mindy Roe Galoob, Tulsa Campaign interim executive director, presented the award to Thomas Padalino, Thoreau Demonstration Academy principal. “Thoreau realizes that providing evidence-based sexual health education not only reduces the likelihood of teen births, but is also directly linked to students’ academic success and eventual graduation. The Tulsa Campaign is thrilled to present this award to Thoreau Demonstration Academy in honor of the teachers, administrators and parents who worked closely together to achieve these exemplary results,” said Galoob.

 

This award follows the award presentation for Community Champion in Care earlier this month to Community Health Connection. The award was created in 2014 with two inaugural recipients: Tulsa Public Schools and the Tulsa City-County Health Department.

 

The Tulsa Campaign began in 2013 to address the community’s high teen birth rates, which research indicates is the leading cause of school dropout among teen girls. Oklahoma has the third highest teen birth rate in the nation, and some Tulsa zip codes have rates double the national average. The Tulsa Campaign partners with schools, community organizations and parents to implement strategies to reduce this rate. Through a unified community effort, teen birth rates in Tulsa County have dropped by 19% since 2013.

 

About the Tulsa Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy
The mission of the Tulsa Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy is to equip the community with strategies to reduce teen pregnancy for the purpose of improving the health and economic well-being for all. Their goal is to reduce the teen birth rate in Tulsa County by 30% by 2020 through systems-level changes.

The organization focuses on increasing public awareness of the issue of teen pregnancy, providing training and technical assistance to schools and community organizations to implement evidence-based, medically-accurate sex education and building the capacity of local health centers and providers to ensure teens have access to healthcare services. For more information about the Tulsa Campaign and how you can make a difference in our community, please visit TulsaCampaign.org.

 


 

COMMUNITY HEALTH CONNECTION RECEIVES COMMUNITY CHAMPION AWARD
FROM THE TULSA CAMPAIGN TO PREVENT TEEN PREGNANCY

 

Tulsa, Okla. – The Tulsa Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy (Tulsa Campaign) presented the Community Champion Award to Community Health Connection (CHC) in a ceremony on November 17, 2015 at CHC’s Kendall-Whittier location.

The award is presented each year to one or more partners of the Tulsa Campaign that best exemplify a focus on reducing Tulsa’s teen birth rate through excellence in care and best practices. CHC received this award for excellence in community health services and the recent expansion of their hours to accommodate Tulsa’s teenage population. CHC is a key provider of a full range of comprehensive primary and preventative health care for all ages, and they are the leading provider of Spanish-language health services.

Mindy Galoob, Tulsa Campaign interim executive director, presented the award to Jim McCarthy, Community Health Connection chief executive officer. McCarthy is a longtime partner of the Tulsa Campaign and was praised by Galoob.

“The Tulsa Campaign is pleased to present this award to Community Health Connection/La Conexión Médica. Community Health Connection is a ground breaker in best practices around community-friendly health care. CHC recognized that there was a need in Tulsa for the Spanish speaking population and worked tirelessly to offer beneficial services to Hispanics in Tulsa, while constantly striving for improvement in community friendly health services,” said Galoob.

The award was created in 2014 with two inaugural recipients: Tulsa Public Schools and the Tulsa City County Health Department. The Tulsa Campaign began in 2013 to address the community’s high teen birth rates. Oklahoma has the third highest teen birth rate in the nation, and some Tulsa zip codes have rates double the national average. The Tulsa Campaign partners with schools, community organizations and parents to implement strategies to reduce this rate. Through a unified community effort, teen birth rates in Tulsa County have dropped by 19% since 2013.

About the Tulsa Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy
The mission of the Tulsa Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy is to equip the community with strategies to reduce teen pregnancy for the purpose of improving the health and economic wellbeing of its citizens. Their goal is to reduce the teen birth rate in Tulsa County by 30% by 2020 through systems-level changes.
The organization focuses on increasing public awareness of the issue of teen pregnancy, providing training and technical assistance to schools and community organizations to implement evidenced-based, medically-accurate sex education and building the capacity of local health centers and providers to ensure teens have access to healthcare services. For more information about the Tulsa Campaign and how you can make a difference in our community, please visit TulsaCampaign.org.

 


 

Tulsa Youth-Serving Programs Receive 1.49 Million Dollar Award

Cooperative agreement from Office of Adolescent Health to fund programs to reduce teen pregnancy in Tulsa County.

 

Tulsa, Okla.- Three Tulsa-area community organizations received a competitive cooperative agreement award of $1,499,600 to continue their work of reducing teen birth rates in Tulsa County through 2020. On July 2, 2015, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of Adolescent Health (OAH) awarded Youth Services of Tulsa, the Tulsa Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy and the Community Service Council this cooperative agreement in order to reach teens who are currently underserved. The three agencies will use a collective impact approach to utilize evidence-based, age-appropriate strategies to reduce teen birth rates.

 

During the 2013-2014 school year, the three recipient organizations along with other community partners offered sexual health education and comprehensive youth development programming to over 4,300 students in Tulsa Public Schools (TPS) and Union Public Schools (UPS). This cooperative agreement award will significantly expand the reach of each organization, providing prevention services to over 6000 Tulsa youth annually. Community Service Council’s Carrera Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention Program, a partnership initiative with UPS and national model Carrera Pregnancy Prevention Program sponsored by the Children’s Aid Society in New York, will expand its intensive holistic approach for UPS 6th-12th grade participants by nearly 50 percent. The Adolescent Health Programs through Youth Services of Tulsa will also expand outreach by 50 percent to TPS students and youth in community-based settings.

 

Upon hearing news of this significant award, Kim Schutz, Executive Director of the Tulsa Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy said “I am thrilled for the Tulsa community. This funding will ensure that Tulsa youth are prepared for the future and are given the tools they need to succeed.”

 

The importance of these evidence-based, age-appropriate interventions is critical. One in every 10 births in Oklahoma is to a teen parent. In recent years, more 18 and 19 year-old teens gave birth in Oklahoma than entered as freshmen at the University of Oklahoma and Oklahoma State University combined. When young people become parents before they are ready, the impact can be devastating because of the interconnected challenges related to teen parenthood including low educational attainment, poverty, workforce issues, family instability and poor economic health.

 

Tulsa School Board Member Suzanne Schreiber’s reaction to this award was positive. She said “this is a critical piece of education in our schools. I know our students will benefit and thrive with access to these programs. Tulsa is fortunate to have these community organizations working to help our students succeed.”

 

Youth Services of Tulsa, the Tulsa Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy and the Community Service Council view this award as an opportunity to deepen and expand the reach of effective interventions beyond the scope of what each organization could accomplish on its own. Their collective vision is of a Tulsa where all youth have the knowledge and opportunity to make healthy choices for their futures.

 

“Youth Services welcomes the opportunity to increase our efforts in providing youth in our community with the information necessary to make good decisions about their health,” said David Grewe, Executive Director of Youth Services.

The July 2015 announcement also included two other Oklahoma-based awards – one in Oklahoma City and the other in the Choctaw Nation.

 

About Youth Services of Tulsa

Youth Services is a partner agency of the Tulsa Area United Way, assisting more than 18,000 youth each year with a continuum of care in four key areas: Runaway and Homeless Services, Counseling, Delinquency Prevention, and Youth Development.

 

About the Tulsa Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy

The Tulsa Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy’s mission is to equip the community with strategies to reduce teen pregnancy for the purpose of improving the health and economic well-being of our citizens. The organization provides training and technical assistance to schools and community organizations to implement evidenced-based sex education, builds the capacity of local health centers to ensure teens have access to excellent healthcare services, and increases public awareness about the issue of teen pregnancy. For more information, visit www.TulsaCampaign.org

 

About Community Service Council

The Community Service Council’s mission is to provide leadership for community-based planning and mobilization of resources to best meet health and human service needs. Its commitment is to prevention – advancing strategies that invest in individuals and families across the lifespan to better care for themselves, their families, and their community.

 

 


 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

 

Fathers Positively Benefit a Child’s Well-Being

Fathers play a big role in preventing teen pregnancy

 

Tulsa, Okla. – As we celebrate the fathers and male guardians in our lives this Father’s Day, it is a good time to discuss the important role that fathers play in preventing teen pregnancy. Teen pregnancy is an issue that impacts everyone–not just an issue for girls. It is important for all males to understand the importance and responsibility of fatherhood as well as how they can impact the lives and futures of children. It is also important for teen daughters and sons to know their fathers care about their health and well-being when it comes to the issue of teen pregnancy.

In 2013, the national teen birth rate for ages 15-19 was 27 births per 1,000 girls. According to a 2012 report by Child Trends “The Characteristics and Circumstances of Teen Fathers: At the Birth of Their First Child and Beyond”, this means around 900,000 young men between the ages of 12 and 16 become fathers each year. While Oklahoma’s teen birth rate is still considerably higher than the national rate at 43, in 2013 the Oklahoma rate dropped 9%. This means over 500 fewer girls and boys became teen parents.

“It takes two to tango and we want teens, both boys and girls, to know that their actions have real consequences and in some cases these result in the additional responsibilities of caring for a child,” said Kim Schutz, Executive Director of the Tulsa Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy. “Teens in the Tulsa community need to know that we care and that we want what is best for them. There is no better way to show you care about a teen than speaking with them about their future, through open and honest conversations that include delaying parenthood until they are ready and can plan for their child’s future.”

Studies have shown that involvement of a father, or a positive male role model, has profound effects on children’s well-being. According to First things First’s article “The Importance of Positive Male Role Models,” children who live in environments void of strong male role-models are more likely to be involved in criminal activity, more likely to engage in sexual activity as an adolescent, and are less likely to achieve in school. Father-child interactions not only reduce the effects of these negative outcomes, but also greatly contribute to a child’s physical and emotional well-being as well as their competency for relating with others. These children also demonstrate greater ability to take initiative and evidence self-control.

For more information and resources on teen pregnancy prevention and how this Father’s Day you can start this important conversation with your teen please visit www.tulsacampaign.org/parents.

About the Tulsa Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy

The mission of the Tulsa Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy is to equip the community with strategies to reduce teen pregnancy for the purpose of improving the health and economic well-being of our citizens. Our goal is to reduce the teen birth rate in Tulsa County by 30% by 2020 through systems-level changes. We focus on providing training and technical assistance to schools and community organizations to implement evidenced-based, sex education, building the capacity of local health centers and providers to ensure teens have access to healthcare services, and increasing public awareness of the issue of teen pregnancy. For more information about the Tulsa Campaign and how you can make a difference in our community, please visit www.TulsaCampaign.org

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